Blueprint #2 – Cultivating Clean Air

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In 1989, the EPA submitted a report to Congress on the quality of indoor air. They discovered over 900 volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) were present in new buildings. Some levels were 100 times greater than normal levels.

The same year NASA published the first list of air-filtering plants. The report showed green and flowering plants removed toxic chemicals from indoor air.

In other words, plants in your home and office can improve the quality of the air. Here's a list of popular plants that can make where you live and work a place to feel better, perform better, any enjoy life more.

Aloe Vera – Medicinal Indoor Plant

Aloe Vera( Aloe Barbadensis Miller), an individual from the lily family, is a spiky, succulent, enduring plant. It is indigenous to eastern and southern Africa, however has been spread all through huge numbers of the hotter areas of the world, and is additionally prevalently developed inside. There are around 300 distinguished species, however Aloe Vera (“genuine aloe”) is the most prominent for therapeutic applications. It has likewise been known as Aloe Vulgaris (“regular aloe”) and Aloe barbadensis. The plant has yellow blossoms and triangular, beefy leaves with serrated edges that emerge from a focal base and may develop to about 2 ft (0.6 m) long. Every leaf is made out of three layers. A reasonable gel, that is the part of the plant utilized for topical application is contained inside the cells of the liberal inward segment. Anthraquinones, which apply a checked purgative impact, are contained in the biting yellow sap of the center leaf layer. The stringy external part of the leaf serves a defensive capacity.Aloe Vera is also an air purification plant.

Scientific Name: Aloe Barbadensis Miller

Common Name: Aloe Vera

Best way to maintain Aloe Vera plant:

Light:

Sitting your Aloe Vera(Aloe Barbadensis Miller) plant in any South confronting window is an extraordinary decision since it will get heaps of daylight. Like most succulents, it’s actually intended for such places and thus you will get bunches of good quality and even development. However Aloe’s will likewise be very glad in a north-bound angle, development will be slower and you should pivot the plant pot each month or so to guarantee an even look. By and large the Aloe Vera plant is versatile with regards to light and it’s hard to turn out badly.

Watering:

During Spring and Summer water altogether every time the dirt has dried out. Where you choose to put the plant will manage to what extent it takes for the dirt to dry out and accordingly to what extent you have to hold up between watering’s. Anything from seven days up to three would be typical. Aloe’s can utilize a great deal of water in hot climate so don’t give the watering a chance to can be an outsider. In Autumn (Fall) and Winter, water a great deal less much of the time. A few people don’t water their plants at all amid Winter and if it’s in an exceptionally cool recognize this is most likely a smart thought with a specific end goal to avert root/stem spoil.

Humidity:

Humidity is truly not essential for all succulents and this incorporates the Aloe Vera plant.

Feeding:

Too much manure on Aloe Vera’s can create delicate and bendy leaves which is regularly undesirable in the inflexible basic striking assortments. It’s a smart thought accordingly to encourage just once in Spring and at the end of the day in Summer with either a desert flora or a universally handy bolster. Just sustain set up plants.

Temperature:

Like it’s light prerequisites, an Aloe Vera will take high temperatures in its walk so don’t stress over overheating. It will expect a cooler temperature in Winter however, yet at the very least 5°C/41°F.

Repotting:

In a short space of time, Aloe Vera plants as a rule create a great deal of balances or suckers which will bit by bit fill the pot. Repot when the pot turns out to be exceptionally congested. You can either keep every one of the plants together in a greater pot in the event that you favor an “occupied” appearance, or separate a portion of the counterbalances for engendering or to give away as endowments.

Propagation:

When it comes to Aloe Vera plant spread it’s uplifting news. It’s simple! Balances or suckers from Aloe’s are straight forward to go ahead, as they do it for the most part without anyone else with little help from us. When you repot, tenderly separate the counterbalances from the parent guaranteeing every one has no less than a couple underlying foundations of its own. Utilize a free depleting manure blend and water well, hold up half a month prior to you water again and never intensely until the counterbalance has legitimately settled.

Speed of Growth:

Your Aloe Vera(Aloe Barbadensis Miller) plant development will be tolerably quick in great conditions. Next to no development ought not out of the ordinary if conditions are poor and obviously over the Winter months.

Stature/Spread:

They typically just achieve 45cm/18in in tallness. Yet, spread (over numerous years) can be colossal because of the balances which fan out around the plant.

Advantages of Aloe Vera :

Aloe Vera produces two substances utilized for drug: The gel is acquired from the cells in the focal point of the leaf, and the latex is gotten from the cells just underneath the leaf skin. The vast majority utilize aloe gel as a solution for skin conditions, including blazes, sunburn, frostbite, psoriasis and mouth blisters, yet there is a large group of other aloe vera benefits. Aloe gel is utilized for treating osteoarthritis, entrail ailments, fever, tingling and irritation.

Aloe Vera is additionally utilized as a characteristic solution for asthma, stomach ulcers, diabetes and for calming symptoms of radiation treatment. Aloe latex is utilized to normally treat sadness, obstruction, asthma and diabetes.

Aloe Vera Nutrition Facts:

Aloe vera contains numerous vitamins and minerals indispensable for appropriate development and capacity of all the body’s frameworks. Here’s a simple clarification of aloe vera’s dynamic parts:

1. Aloe vera contains cell reinforcement vitamins A, C and E — in addition to vitamin B12, folic corrosive and choline.

2.It contains eight compounds, including aliiase, antacid phosphatase, amylase, bradykinase, carboxypeptidase, catalase, cellulase, lipase and peroxidase.

3.Minerals, for example, calcium, copper, selenium, chromium, manganese, magnesium, potassium, sodium and zinc are available in aloe vera.

4.It gives 12 anthraquinones — or mixes known as intestinal medicines. Among these are aloin and emodin, which go about as analgesics, antibacterials and antivirals.

5.Four unsaturated fats are available, including cholesterol, campesterol, beta-sisosterol and lupeol — all giving calming comes about.

6.The hormones called auxins and gibberellins are available; they help with recuperating wounds and have calming properties.

7.Aloe vera gives sugars, for example, monosaccharides (glucose and fructose) and polysaccharides.

Pygmy Date Palm – Indoor Plant

The Pygmy Date Palm (Phoenix roebelenii) tree is the perfect little specimen. In case you are searching for a beautiful fine feather leaf palm for indoors or patio containers consider planting one or more of these. Pygmy date palm grows slowly reaching heights of 8-10 ft. The stem is covered with old leaf bases and is topped with a dense head of bright green pinnate leaves that develop to about 4 ft in length. According to NASA’s clear air study, this plant removes all indoor air toxins.

Scientific Name: Phoenix roebelenii
Common Name: pygmy date palm, miniature date palm or just robellini.

How to grow and maintain pygmy date palm:

Light:

They prefer Bright indirect light. Strong morning light from an East-facing window will give your palm the light it needs. Give the plant a quarter turn each week to open all sides to daylight.
Soil:
the soil of a Pygmy Date Palm moist however never soggy during most of the year. In winter, enabling the soil to dry out before watering. The fronds of a Date Palm turn brown from too much water or from hard

Temperature:
Temperature ranges should fall between 60 degrees around evening time and 70 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit during the day to keep up a healthy growth rate.

Water:
Water your palm plant well. It likes water and should be watered at least three times a week during hotter months. During winter, your palm will require water twice per week. On the off chance that your palm is planted in the full shade, you can cut the watering schedule in half.

Fertilizer:
Prepare your pygmy palm quarterly with manure particular to palms. You’ll have the capacity to discover palm fertilizer at your local gardening center. Pygmy palms love fertilizer, so the more general your fertilizing schedule is, the better your palm will grow.

Propagation:
Remove the suckers that develop at the base of the plant. Make sure to include the roots with it, and put them in separate containers. Plants can be grown from seeds, but you’ll wait years for the plant to grow into a tree.

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Corn Plant (Dracaena fragrans Massangeana) – Indoor House Plant

Corn Plant (Dracaena fragrans Massangeana) is one of the most popular houseplants for removing indoor air toxins such as formaldehyde, ammonia, xylene, and toluene. Corn Plant is an unbranched, tree-like plant with sword-shaped arching leaves. The dark-green leaves are 60 cm long and 10 cm wide, and have a broad cream-to-yellow stripe down the center. Strongly scented blossoms are occasionally produced on a plant. Older plants may bloom indoors, but it’s rare. According to the NASA Clean Air Study, the Dracaena fragrans Massangeana filters airborne toxins from the atmosphere. The sap is poisonous to animals. It is not considered toxic to humans but should not be ingested. Keep it away from pets.

Scientific Name: Dracaena fragrans ‘Massangeana’
Common Names: Corn Plant or Cornstalk plant
How to grow and maintain Dracaena fragrans Massangeana (Corn Plant):

Light:
It grows best in the bright and indirect light. Avoid direct sunlight. Because direct sunlight will burn the leaves. In Indoors, keep the plants in an east or west-facing window out of direct sun or in a shaded southern window. They can be put outside during the spring and summer months as long as the location remains shaded.

Soil:
It thrives best in organically rich, consistently moist, well-drained soils. Use a loamy, peaty, well-drained potting soil.

Temperature:
Corn Plant prefers ideal room temperature between 65 – 75°F / 18-24°C. Under 55°F/12°C is going to harm the plant which may become noticeable if the leaves begin curling. Try and avoid the plant being near cold drafts, which will also cause harm.

Water:
Water regularly, during the growing season. Always keep the soil moist, but not soggy. In winter, reduce watering. Allow the top 2- inch of soil to dry slightly to touch between waterings, but never allow the soils to totally dry out.

Fertilizer:
Fertilize your plant once every two to three weeks, during the growing season with a balanced liquid fertilizer diluted by half.

Propagation:
Corn Plant can be easily propagated by stem tip cuttings. Take 4 – 6-inch stem tip cuttings in spring or summer and pot them in the moist potting mix. You can also cut a new or old rosette and re-plant it. After replanting keep the soil moist and mist the leaves which will encourage the plant to grow. A tall plant can be propagated using the air layering method.

Pruning:
Prune it back in spring or early summer to control its growth. You can cut off the cane at any height. It will sprout a new cluster of leaves from where it was cut. Expel the lower leaves when they begin to yellow.

Repotting:
Re-pot the corn Plant once very 2 -3 years during the spring season.

Pests and Diseases:
Corn Plant Plant has no serious pest or disease problems. Look for spider mites, mealy bugs, thrips, and scale. The most widely recognized plant diseases that affect Corn Plant are fusarium root and stem rot.

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Chlorophytum comosum picturatum (Spider Plant) – Indoor House Plants

Chlorophytum comosum picturatum is the most popular air-purifier, clumping perennial, indoor house plant. It has long, narrow green leaves that are striped with cream. The mature plant will form plantlets on the end of its long, thin stems. Small, star-shaped flowers on long stems are produced throughout the year. According to a NASA clean air study, Chlorophytum comosum picturatum Plant can filter formaldehyde, xylene, and toluene from the air. Spider Plant is non-poisonous to pets. Perfect for growing in backyard gardens, hanging baskets and pots.

Scientific Name: Chlorophytum comosum picturatum
Common Name: Ribbon Plant, Spider Plant, Airplane Plant, St Benard’s Lily.
How to grow and maintain Chlorophytum comosum picturatum (Spider Plant):

Light:
It thrives best in a bright, indirect sunlight to maintain the variegation on the leaves. Keep the spider plant out of direct sunlight because it can scorch leaves and even grow well in artificial lighting.

Soil:
It grows well in a well-drained peat-moss based potting mix, such as an African violet mix. The soil should be slightly alkaline ( pH level of 6.0 and 7.2).

Water:
Water regularly, during the growing season (April to September), but water sparingly when dormant (autumn and winter). Allow the top of the soil to slightly dry out before watering again.

Temperature:
It prefers average room temperatures of 65°F – 75°F / 18°C – 24°C suit this tropical plant perfectly. It doesn’t like the cold, don’t expose it to anything below 50°F / 10°C.

Fertilizer:
Fertilize every two weeks during the growing season, from spring through summer with a balanced liquid fertilizer diluted by half. Do not fertilize during the winter.

Humidity:
It prefers moderate indoor humidity. If the leaves turn brown and crispy, raise the humidity around it.

Pruning:
You can prune spider plant leaves in the spring or summer. Remove all discolored, diseased, or dead foliage as needed. Always use sharp pruners or scissors when pruning spider plants. To remove the spiderettes, cut the long stems back to the base from both the mother plant and the baby.

Re-potting:
Re-pot in spring when the plant has outgrown its pot. If you see roots growing out of the drainage holes, just change the pot to one size bigger for the best growth and flowering.

Propagation:
It can be easily propagated by division in late spring or by plantlets. Once your plant outgrows its container, simply remove it, break or cut it in half or thirds, and re-pot the new chunks in new pots. Mature spider plants will also produce plantlets at their end of long, stiff stems. Simply cut off the small plant, stick it in a small pot of moist indoor Potting Mix, and water gently.
Pests and Diseases:

Spider plants are susceptible to the mealy bug, scale, spider mites, and Aphids. To get rid of these pests, you can spray a Spider plant monthly with an insecticidal soap or green solution.

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Ficus elastica Melany (Rubber Plant) – Indoor House Plants

Ficus elastica Melany (Rubber Plant) is a most loved indoor houseplant. It has deep, glossy green leaves that are greenish burgundy in color. Rubber Plant filters airborne toxins from the atmosphere, therefore it is a great plant for improving the environment in both homes and offices. It is considered to be poisonous. keep it away from children and pets.

Scientific Name: Ficus elastica Melany
Common Name: Rubber Plant

How to grow and maintain Ficus elastica Melany (Rubber plant):

Light:
It thrives best in medium to bright indirect sunlight.

Soil:
It grows well in a well-draining and well-aerated potting soil. Use one part peat, one part pine bark and one part coarse sand (or perlite) is a good mix.

Water:
Water when the soil starts to become slightly dry at the top, but never allow the soils to totally dry out. Always keep the soil moist, but not soggy.

Humidity:
Normal room humidity of 40-50% is ideal. Indoor air can plummet in winter, so it’s a good idea to increase the humidity for your houseplants.

Temperature:
It prefers average room temperatures of 60°F – 75°F / 15°C – 24°C. Avoid lower than 55°F (12°C), sudden temperature drops and cold drafts.

Fertilizer:
Fertilize once a month spring through summer with a balanced liquid fertilizer diluted by half.

Pruning:
Once the rubber plant has grown to the height you want it to grow up to, you can cut the top off. You may also want to prune back any unwanted branches to give the plant a fuller shape. It’s best to prune in spring or summer but any other time will be fine.

Propagation:
It can be easily propagated by stem tip cuttings. Take stem cuttings in spring. To keep its sticky, white sap from forming a cap on the base of the cutting, place the tip in water for 30 minutes. Remove from the water and dip only the cut surface in rooting hormone. Then insert it into the moist potting mix to root.

Pests and Diseases:
Rubber plants are susceptible to the mealy bug, scale, spider mites. To get rid of these pests, you can spray a rubber plant monthly with an insecticidal soap or green solution.

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Ficus Ginseng – Indoor Plants

Ficus Ginseng is an ornamental indoor plant. It has green to dark green leaves which alternate up the stem and which are more oval than the Benjamina and more like the Retusa, but more extensive. The leaves are glossy, dark green, leathery and densely clothed on branches. Grey-brown bark which is relatively smooth has a heavy trunk with terrific aerial roots. It makes an excellent bonsai and looks brilliant in any contemporary room setting. Ficus Ginseng filters airborne toxins from the environment. It is considered to be poisonous, therefore keep away from children and animals.

Scientific Name: Ficus microcarpa Ginseng
Common Names: Ficus Ginseng, Indian Laurel, Belly Fig, Laurel Fig, Laurel Rubber, Curtain Fig, and Strangling Fig.

How to grow and maintain Ficus microcarpa Ginseng:

Light:
It thrives best bright, indirect light but can tolerate some partial shade. Harsh, direct sunlight may burn the leaves.

Water:
Water your plant regularly during the growing season and always keep the soil evenly moist but never allow your plant to sit in water. You can allow the topsoil to become slightly dry between each watering. During the winter months, reduce watering.

Temperature:
It grows well as an indoor bonsai, although being a tropical it likewise appreciates being outside in the summer. In indoors the plant should be kept in conditions between 60-80 degrees Fahrenheit, and protected from drafts to avoid leaf drop. When outdoors in the hottest summer months offer a few protection from the direct afternoon sun.

Fertilizer:
Feed weekly or every two weeks during summer, every two to four weeks during winter. Liquid fertilizer can be utilized as well as natural manure pellets. Ficus trees will respond almost immediately to fertilizing with beautiful new growth.

Pruning:
Regular pruning is necessary to retain the tree’s shape. Prune back to two leaves after six to eight leaves have grown. The tree should only be pruned during the periods of active growth.

Propagation:
It can be easily propagated by seed (Growing ficus plants from seed in spring), by cutting, or by Air-layering (Air-layering will work best in April – May).

Pests and Diseases:
There is no serious pest or disease problems. There is no serious pest or disease problems. But sometimes, susceptible to spider mites or other critters, so maintaining a good feeding and watering routine is important to keep your tree healthy and immune.

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Phoenix canariensis – Indoor House Plants

Phoenix canariensis is the most popular palm species. It has a husk-like stem consisting of wide, emerald green leaf bases partly covered with brown, fibrous hair. The dark green fronds are finely divided and their stalks are a paler green. The fruit is an oval, yellow to orange drupe 2 cm long and 1 cm in diameter and containing a single large seed, the fruit pulp is edible but too thin to be worth eating. Palms clean and improve air quality by filtering formaldehyde, benzene and carbon monoxide toxins from the surrounding environment.

Scientific Name: Phoenix canariensis
Common Names: Canary Island date palm and pineapple palm.

How to grow and maintain Phoenix canariensis:

Light:
It prefers full Sun to medium light. Your best to provide it a combination of sunlight and shade, which makes an east or west-facing window a good spot to place your plant.

Soil:
It grows best in a peat-based potting mix with good drainage is best used. Two parts peat and one perlite or sand work fine. Fine pine bark works well within a mix too.

Temperature:
It prefers an average room temperature of 16 to 24°C (65- 75°F). They do best if they are encouraged to have a winter rest period at about 10-13°C (50-55°F). Avoid cold drafts.

Humidity:
It prefers average room humidity is fine. To improve humidity mist the leaves during the summer (if the air becomes dry) and when the air is dry from artificial heating.

Water:
Water moderately but consistently during the growing season, Keep the soil moist but not soggy. Allow the top one inch of soil to dry out between waterings. Reduce watering during the winter season.

Propagation:
Remove the suckers that develop at the base of the plant. Make sure to include the roots with it, and put them in separate containers. Plants can be grown from seeds, but you’ll wait years for the plant to grow into a tree.

Re-Potting:
Re-pot this palm only when it has become pot bound. Every 2 years you can top dress the soil by removing the top few inches and replacing it, then every 4 years completely renew the soil and check the root systems size and health. Roots may need pruning.

Pests and Diseases:
There is no serious pest or disease problems. Maybe attacked by glasshouse red spider mite, thrips, mealybugs, and scale insects.

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Sansevieria zeylanica (Snake Plant) – Indoor Plants

Sansevieria zeylanica is a stemless evergreen perennial plant. Leaves are erect, fleshy, sharply-pointed, sword-shaped, deep green with light, gray-green horizontal stripes and are 18 – 30 inches or longer and 2.5 cm wide from a rhizomatous rootstock. It is an excellent plant for purifying the air and removing toxins from indoor environments. It is toxic if chewed or eaten. Keep away from children and animals.

Scientific Name: Sansevieria zeylanica
Common Names: Snake Plant, Ceylon Bowstring Hemp, Devil’s Tongue, Zeylanica Snake Plant, Mother-in-Law’s Tongue.
How to grow and maintain Sansevieria zeylanica (Snake Plant):

Light:
It requires bright, filtered light and can stand plenty of direct sunlight but will adapt to low light conditions too.

Soil:
It thrives best in well-drained, sandy soil enriched with peaty compost.

Water:
Water your plant regularly during the growing season and always keep the soil evenly moist but not soggy. Allow the topsoil to become slightly dry between each watering. During the winter months, reduce watering.

Temperature:
It prefers an average to warm room temperatures 65 – 75 degrees Fahrenheit / 18 – 24 degrees Celsius. It will endure fluctuating temperatures, but not below 55 degrees Fahrenheit / 13 degrees Celsius.

Fertilizer:
Fertilize monthly during the active growth periods in the spring and summer, with a liquid or water-soluble fertilizer. Try not to fertilize during the winter season.

Propagation:
It can be easily propagated by dividing up overcrowded clumps of leaves. Separate clusters of leaves from rootstock with a sharp blade or knife when the leaves are six inches long. Most clusters will have some roots attached and can be planted directly in the normal potting mixture. Also can be propagated by leaf cuttings.

Re-Potting:
Re-pot the plant during the spring season, only when plants get crowded and need dividing.

Pests and Diseases:
There is no serious pest or disease problems. Watch for bugs, spiders, and mealybugs.
Medicinal Uses of Sansevieria zeylanica:

The dried rhizomes and roots provide material for antiseptic ointments.
The roots are used for purgative, tonic, expectorant and anti-fever remedies.
The Sansevieria zeylanica is used traditionally in the treatment of septic wounds.

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Calathea majestica – Indoor Plants

Calathea majestica is a decorative and air-purifying plant. It has oblong paddle-shaped leaves with elegant pinstripes going from the midrib to the margin. The deep magenta underside makes this one of the most popular Calathea. It is a lovely selection of air purifying plants for our homes, office and other interiors.

Scientific Name: Calathea majestica
Common Name: Calathea
How to grow and maintain Calathea majestica:

Light:
It flourishes best in bright indirect sunlight or filtered sunlight to partial shade. Keep your plant out of direct sunlight, because too much of direct sunlight burns the leaves of a Plant and causes the wonderful leaf hues to fade. Keep your plant in front of East, west, or north facing window is suitable.

Soil:
It grows well in moist, well-drained, fertile organic soil with a mix of sand.

Temperature:
It thrives well in average room temperatures between 65 – 75ºF / 18 – 24ºC and no lower than 60ºF / 15ºC. Avoid drafts and sudden temperature changes.

Humidity:
Humidity levels need to be moderate to high for this plant. A wet pebble tray or a room humidifier should help to raise levels adequately.

Water:
Water regularly, during the growing season. Keep soil constantly moist but never water-logged. Overwatering can cause root rot and kill the plant. During the winter season, reduce watering and only water the plant when the top inch soil to dry out between watering. Use distilled water or rainwater because this plant is sensitive to fluoride and salts in tap water.

Fertilizer:
Fertilize every two weeks during the growing season (spring and summer) with a 10-10-5 liquid fertilizer diluted by half. In fall and winter, feed monthly.

Propagation:
Calathea majestica can be easily propagated by division. Divide rhizomes of mature plants in spring or early summer.

Repotting:
Re-pot during spring season once every 2 years, just in a somewhat bigger pot if the roots have consumed all the space with the present pot.

Pests and Diseases:
It is very susceptible to Spider mites, scale, Mealy Bugs, and Aphids. Likewise, watch for fluoride toxicity and fungal and bacterial leaf spots.

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Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum ‘Mauna Loa’) – Indoor Plants

Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum ‘Mauna Loa’) is the most popular air-filtering plant. It has bold, long, elliptical leaves held on foot long leaf stems. The leaves grow upward and arch outward at their tips. The flower stem can be up to 20 inches long and bears unusual blooms, each with a finger-like floral column surrounded by a large petal-like leaf. These are held above the foliage atop leafless stems. The snowy white blooms are long-lasting and turn green as they age. Flowering can occur year round but is most prevalent from winter to summer. According to the NASA Clean Air Study, the Peace Lily filters indoor air pollution, particularly benzene, formaldehyde, trichloroethylene, ammonia, xylene, and toluene.

Scientific Name: Spathiphyllum ‘Mauna Loa’
Common Names: Peace Lily

How to grow and maintain Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum ‘Mauna Loa’):

Light:
It thrives best in bright light, but no direct sun. Direct sunlight will burn the leaves. This plant will tolerate low light but may bloom poorly.

Soil:
It grows well in a well-drained, peat-based potting mix with perlite is ideal or other peat based mixes.

Water:
Water your plant regularly during the growing season and always keep the soil evenly moist but not soggy. You can allow the top 1 inch of soil to dry out between each watering. During the winter months, reduce watering.

Temperature:
It prefers average room temperatures 65°F of – 75°F / 18°C – 24°C. Avoid lower than 55°F / 12°C in the winter.

Humidity:
The peace lily is especially sensitive to dry air and should be kept on trays of moist pebbles throughout the year. The leaves should also be mist-sprayed frequently. It needs a relative humidity of 40% or higher.

Fertilizer:
Fertilize monthly in spring and summer with a balanced houseplant fertilizer that includes micronutrients, using half the recommended strength. Yellow edges on leaves are an indication of nutrient deficiency.

Propagation:
It can be easily propagated by division in the spring. Pull rhizomes apart gently, making sure that each piece has at least two or three leaves attached. Plant individual pieces in 3 inches pots of either of the recommended potting mixture, burying each piece at the same depth as the entire rhizome was planted. Try not to apply any fertilizer to the newly potted rhizome sections for three months.

Pests and Diseases:
Peace Lily has no serious pest or disease problems. Watch for Red spider mites and mealybug.

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Heart Leaf Philodendron (Philodendron cordatum) – Indoor Plants

Heart Leaf Philodendron (Philodendron cordatum) is an evergreen, ornamental houseplant. It has long, climbing stems, generally with short internodes. Leaves can be rather large in the wild but are often only a 2-4 inch heart-shaped leaves under interior conditions. Philodendron cordatum is one of the best air-filtering plants that remove airborne toxins such as formaldehyde, benzene, and trichloroethylene from the atmosphere. These plants are poisonous. Keep away from children and pets. It is ideally used as a hanging plant or table plant and also perfect for planting in dish gardens or terrariums.
Scientific classification:

Family: Araceae
Genus: Philodendron
Species: P. cordatum

Scientific Name: Philodendron cordatum
Common Name: Heart Leaf Philodendron

How to grow and maintain Heart Leaf Philodendron (Philodendron cordatum):

Light:
It requires bright indirect sunlight. Avoid direct sunlight.

Soil:
It grows well in moist but well-drained, sandy soil. Use a soil-based potting mix.

Water:
Water your plant regularly during the growing season and always keep the soil evenly moist but not soggy. You can allow the topsoil to become slightly dry between each watering. During the winter months, reduce watering. Yellow leaves are caused by overwatering.

Temperature:
It thrives well in minimum temperature between 70 degrees Fahrenheit to 80 degrees Fahrenheit / 24 degrees Celsius to 27 degrees Celsius during the day time and above 55 degrees Fahrenheit (13ºC) at night.

Fertilizer:
Fertilize every month from spring through fall with a balanced liquid fertilizer diluted by half.

Pruning:
It is important to keep the long vines pruned so that the plant continues to look full and not leggy. Always pinch after a leaf node. A new stem will grow from that node.

Re-potting:
Re-pot your plant every two years, in spring or early summer. Utilize a container with drainage holes to prevent root rot.

Propagation:
It can be easily propagated by stem cuttings. Take stem tip cuttings in spring or early summer. Be sure the stem cutting has several nubs on it. Nubs are the little bumps where the leaves meet the stem. It roots easily in water or moist soil.

Pests and Diseases:
There is no serious pest or disease problems. They are susceptible to attacks by aphids, spider mites, mealybugs, and scale. Leaf spots may occur. Root rot can occur in overly moist soils.

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Dracaena Plant – Indoor Plants

Dracaena Plant is the most popular indoor plant. It has attractive large and strap-shaped leaves in rosettes at the tips of the stems The leaves are leathery, shiny, and dark green, with whitish margins. These plants may grow up to 4 m tall, single-stemmed or branched. The blossoms are produced on a much-branched flowering head. The flowers are silvery-white and described as sweetly or strongly scented. The two-lobed berry-like fruit ripens to a reddish-orange color. According to the NASA Clean Air Study, the Dracaena aletriformis filters airborne toxins from the surrounding environment.
Scientific classification:

Family: Asparagaceae
Subfamily: Nolinoideae
Genus: Dracaena
Species: D. aletriformis

Scientific Name: Dracaena aletriformis
Synonyms: Dracaena hookeriana, Pleomele hookeriana, Dracaena rumphii, Dracaena latifolia, Draco hookeriana, Cordyline rumphii, Yucca aletriformis, Sansevieria paniculata.
Common Names: Large-leaved dragon tree, Dracaena Plant.

How to grow and maintain Dracaena Plant (Dracaena aletriformis):

Light:
It grows best in the bright and indirect light. Avoid direct sunlight. Because direct sunlight will burn the leaves. In Indoors, keep the plants in an east or west-facing window out of direct sun or in a shaded southern window. They can be put outside during the spring and summer months as long as the location remains shaded.

Soil:
It thrives best in organically rich, consistently moist, well-drained potting soil.

Temperature:
It prefers the ideal room temperature between 65°F – 75°F / 18°C – 24°C. Under 55°F/12°C is going to harm the plant which may become noticeable if the leaves begin curling. Try and avoid the plant being near cold drafts, which will also cause harm.

Water:
Water regularly, during the growing season. Always keep the soil moist, but not soggy. In winter, reduce watering. Allow the top 2- inch of soil to dry slightly to touch between waterings, but never allow the soils to totally dry out.

Fertilizer:
Fertilize your plant once every two to three weeks, during the growing season with a balanced liquid fertilizer diluted by half.

Pruning:
Prune it back in spring or early summer to control its growth. You can cut off the cane at any height. It will sprout a new cluster of leaves from where it was cut. Remove the lower leaves when they begin to yellow.

Repotting:
Re-pot the Plant once very 2 -3 years during the spring season.

Pests and Diseases:
It has no serious pest or disease problems. Watch for spider mites, mealy bugs, thrips, and scale. The most widely recognized plant diseases that affect the Plant are fusarium root and stem rot.
Propagation:

It can be easily propagated by seed or by stem tip cuttings. Take 4 – 6 inches stem tip cuttings in spring or summer and pot them in the moist potting mix. You can also cut a new or old rosette and re-plant it. After replanting keep the soil moist and mist the leaves which will encourage the plant to grow. A tall plant can be propagated using the air layering method.

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Dieffenbachia Compacta (Dumb Cane) – Indoor House Plants

Dieffenbachia Compacta (Dumb Cane) is a herbaceous perennial, air-purifying, indoor house plant. It has vivid medium green leaves, heavily dappled with creamy-white central splurges. The pale-yellow covers roughly half of the leaf with very irregular edges. This dieffenbachia Compacta variety is a perfect option for the home or office. As per the NASA Clean Air Study, the Dieffenbachia Compacta filters airborne toxins from the atmosphere. The sap of Dieffenbachia Compacta is poisonous. So keep the children away from these plants.

Scientific Name: Dieffenbachia Compacta

Common Names: Dumb Cane

How to grow and maintain Dieffenbachia Compacta (Dumb Cane):

Light:
It thrives best in the bright filtered light. Keep the plant away from direct sunlight, because direct sun burns the leaves and too much bright light causes the vibrant leaf color to fade.

Soil:
It grows well in rich organic, well-drained soil. To mix your own soil add 1 part moist humus or peat, 1 part garden soil and 1 part Perlite or coarse sand.

Water:
Water your plant regularly during the growing season and always keep the soil evenly moist but not soggy. You can allow the topsoil to become slightly dry between each watering. During the winter months, reduce watering.

Temperature:
It prefers an ideal temperature of 65 degrees Fahrenheit – 85 degrees Fahrenheit / 18 degrees Celsius – 29 degrees Celsius. Cannot tolerate temperatures below about 10°C (50°F).

Fertilizer:
Fertilize every two weeks in the summer and once a month in the spring and fall with a liquid fertilizer. Don’t fertilize during the winter months when the plant’s growth rate is slowed.

Re-potting:
Re-pot your plants in the spring if the roots have filled the existing pot. Move dumbcane plants into one size bigger pot.

Propagation:
It can be easily propagated by stem cuttings in spring or early summer or via air layering. Take the cutting (3 – 5 inches long) below a node, strip off lower leaves and dip the cut end in a hormone rooting powder. Plant the cutting in a pot containing a moistened an equal-parts mixture of peat moss and coarse sand.

Pests and Diseases:
There is no serious pest or disease problems. Watch for spider mites, scale, aphids, and mealybugs. Utilize an adequate pesticide to eradicate the pests. Dumbcane plants are subject to Bacterial Leaf Spot Disease and other bacterial diseases.

Boston Fern (Nephrolepis exaltata Bostoniensis) – Indoor House Plants

Boston Fern (Nephrolepis exaltata Bostoniensis) is an evergreen, clump-forming fern. It is one of the easiest of the ferns to grow indoors. It has graceful, arching, green fronds with a ruffled appearance. The fronds are 20-98 inch long and 2-6 inch broad, with alternate pinnae, each pinna being 1-3 inch long. The pinnate vein pattern is also visible on these highly compound leaves. The edges appear slightly serrate. Boston Fern is truly outstanding for absorbing toxins and producing oxygen. It is therefore ideal for the office environment where it helps to absorb radioactivity and static energy created by digital equipment and computers. It is considered to be non-toxic to pets.

Scientific Name: Nephrolepis exaltata Bostoniensis

Common Names: Boston Fern, Sword fern.

Boston Fern (Nephrolepis exaltata Bostoniensis) - Indoor House Plants

How to grow and maintain Boston Fern (Nephrolepis exaltata Bostoniensis):

Light:
It thrives best in moderate, indirect light. Avoid direct sunlight and deep shade.

Soil:
It grows well in humus rich soil. Use a peat-based potting mix, 2 parts peat and 1 part perlite is one mixture that will be fine. A peat-based mixture with organic material is also good.

Water:
Water your plant regularly during the growing season and always keep the soil evenly moist but never allow your plant to sit in water. You can allow the topsoil to become slightly dry between each watering. During the winter months, reduce watering.

Temperature:
It thrives well in room temperatures between 65 degrees Fahrenheit – 75 degrees Fahrenheit / 18 degrees Celsius – 24 degrees Celsius are ideal, and no lower than 55 degrees Fahrenheit (13 degrees Celsius).

Fertilizer:
During spring and summer, fertilize weekly or biweekly with balanced liquid fertilizer diluted by half. Deformed leaves with brown or yellow spots or edges are a sign of too much fertilizer.

Re-Potting:
Re-pot the Nephrolepis exaltata Green Lady once every 2 years in the spring, moving the plant into a pot only one size larger.

Pruning:
Pickoff yellowed leaves and older fronds as desired. You may also trim off the hair-like projecting stems. Keep to desired height and shape with light pruning or clipping at any time.

Propagation:
It can be propagated by division of the rooted runners. Divide older plants every 3 – 5 years. Use a sharp knife and slice the rootball in half or quarters. Replant each piece. Trim any damaged fronds. The best time to do this is April through July.

Pests and Diseases:
There is no serious pest or disease problems. They are susceptible to attacks by scales, spider mites, and mealy bugs.
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Brian
Author: Brian